Wounded Warrior Project undertakes staff reforms

Wounded Warrior Project undertakes staff reforms

Wounded Warrior Project undertakes staff reforms Wounded Warrior Project (WWP), one of the fastest growing charities in the United States in the last 10 years is undertaking reforms to further align itself to the achievement of its goal of providing services relevant to the injured war veterans it serves.

Newly appointed chief executive Ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Linnington recently announced that the non-profit will cut its executive plantilla by half and realign its staffing resources by cutting 15% of 600 current positions. 

“Leading Wounded Warrior Project with rigor and discipline, while being transparent and fiscally responsible is – and will remain – a priority as we make organizational changes to better serve those who need this organization most,” Linnington told reporters.

The specific plan of action includes three key points, which are: cutting executive staff to eight from the current 15; cutting administrative costs through consolidated operations; and streamlining of the workforce to focus on areas of greatest need.

Additionally, the chief executive said that the WWP will cut staff in programs relating to health and wellness, and abolishing its Transition Training Academy. Still, new positions will be created to deliver mental health services. Although it will close offices in nine key cities, WWP will maintain a footprint in them to continue providing services.